There’s shysters in any trade, and they’re the worst kind of shysters who will take advantage of another person’s misfortune. There’s those I know will fleece a widow of less than a week for a solid oak coffin, satin lining, solid brass handles’ the lot, when a plain veneer will do the job. I haven’t heard a corpse complain yet.
Graham Swift - Last Orders
proofmathisbeautiful

proofmathisbeautiful:

Mesmerizing Interiors Of Iran’s Mosques Captured In Rare Photographs By Mohammad Domiri

Mohammad Domiri, a talented architectural photographer from northern Iran, takes stunning photos of grandiose mosque architecture throughout the Middle East.

Middle Eastern architecture is often recognized by its elegantly curved arches and spiraling columns, which feature heavily throughout Domiri’s photos. Many of the historic sites Domiri shoots are decorated with colorful stained-glass windows, geometric decorations and painstakingly detailed mosaics, so he shoots with special wide-angle lenses to make sure that he captures all of these details. Because they are historic structures, many of these mosques also impose heavy restrictions on photography – making photos like Domiri’s very rare.

Carl Hempel in his Philosophy of Natural Science wrote, “The high prestige that science enjoys today is no doubt attributable in large measure to the striking successes and the rapidly expanding reach of its applications.” More recently, Carl Sagan (1996), in his last lectures and penultimate book, made the same argument: people are fooled into believing in all kinds of nonsense, but none of these things actually work. Perhaps the declining prestige of science that Sagan lamented may be accounted for in a parallel vein: an increasing sense of the ways in which science has not worked has led to disenchantment.
Naomei Oreskes - Epilogue (“The Rejection of the Continental Drift”).
"While soul measurement did not spawn a major research tradition, measurement in other fields did. Philosopher Ian Hacking has referred to the  early twentieth century as possessed by a "fetish of measurement" as the  techniques  of the physical sciences spread not only to the life sciences but to the social sciences as well. Reflecting on this trend, Norton Wise has described numbers as canonical of modernity. Although measurement and particularly mathematization were viewed with skepticism and even dismay by many, they were also seemingly inexorable; in some fields it became nearly impossible not to do quantitative work. Economics particularly embraced quantification in the interest of prediction and control; at the University of Chicago, measurement became a mantra, and Lord Kelvin’s famous complaint, that unless one could measure a thing, one could hardly be said to know anything about  it, was enshrined as a motto  on the  facade of the social sciences building."
Naomi Oreskes - The Rejection of Continental Drift. Chapter 10: The Depersonalization of Geology

"While soul measurement did not spawn a major research tradition, measurement in other fields did. Philosopher Ian Hacking has referred to the  early twentieth century as possessed by a "fetish of measurement" as the  techniques  of the physical sciences spread not only to the life sciences but to the social sciences as well. Reflecting on this trend, Norton Wise has described numbers as canonical of modernity. Although measurement and particularly mathematization were viewed with skepticism and even dismay by many, they were also seemingly inexorable; in some fields it became nearly impossible not to do quantitative work. Economics particularly embraced quantification in the interest of prediction and control; at the University of Chicago, measurement became a mantra, and Lord Kelvin’s famous complaint, that unless one could measure a thing, one could hardly be said to know anything about  it, was enshrined as a motto  on the  facade of the social sciences building."

Naomi Oreskes - The Rejection of Continental Drift. Chapter 10: The Depersonalization of Geology